keep it real, give love ✌

September 18, 2014 at 9:06pm
5,637 notes
Reblogged from pleatedjeans
pleatedjeans:

Human attack! [video]

pleatedjeans:

Human attack! [video]

(via b3elzebub)

September 2, 2014 at 2:06am
78,034 notes
Reblogged from solipsistic-interjection

I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged.

— : I am not Mike Brown. (via asgardian-feminist)

(via spin-and-spirulina)

2:03am
716,784 notes
Reblogged from sandflake

we-workoutt:

sandflake:

I dearly wish that people would view their bodies as they view flowers…

Veins everywhere?

image

gorgeous~

Skin patches? Birthmarks?

image

hella rad~

Scars? Stretch marks?

image

beautiful~

Freckles? Moles? Acne scars?

image

heckie yeah~

Large? Curvy?

image

lovely~

Small? Thin?

image

charming~

Missing a few pieces?

image

handsome as ever~

Feel like you just look weird?

image

you’re fantastic looking~

This is awesome.

(via mentalalchemy)

August 23, 2014 at 3:41pm
82,192 notes
Reblogged from saf-rimmings

saf-rimmings:

I-G-G-BYE

(via godh8sfags2)

3:35pm
0 notes

My anxiety has gotten so severe. Today is terrible. So terrible that I’m turning to tumblr. Simply out of my unrecognizable character.

August 19, 2014 at 1:12am
68,894 notes
Reblogged from theblogofmicah
sh0ckvalue:

theblogofmicah:

Always the best option.

thisss

sh0ckvalue:

theblogofmicah:

Always the best option.

thisss

(via think-before-you-die)

12:09am
768 notes
Reblogged from humanrightswatch
humanrightswatch:



On the Ground in Ferguson, Missouri
The unrest that has roiled the city of Ferguson, Missouri, since police fatally shot an unarmed 18-year-old African American, Michael Brown, over a week ago, continues unabated. Sunday night was reportedly the most violent yet, with police firing teargas and rubber bullets and using sound cannons against protesters; Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is calling in the National Guard.
Last night’s police actions took me and many of the protesters I spoke to by surprise, not only because they happened well before the curfew, but because while the crowd I saw was angry, it also seemed peaceful. Yet as I was leaving the barricaded protest area, I saw half a dozen police cars pull up and a group of officers donning gas masks and preparing to enter the protest zone. Police say that they came under assault from gunfire and Molotov cocktails. I can’t say with certainty that they didn’t. But that’s not what protesters on the scene told me; four who had been at the front of the protest said that they didn’t see any attacks on the police, but that the police began teargassing them when the protesters simply tried to go past a line police had said they shouldn’t cross. They saw some protesters smash the windows of a McDonald’s as they were retreating, and throw teargas canisters back at the police—but that’s a far cry from the violence the police have described.
I’ve spoken to many demonstrators since arriving in Ferguson on Sunday morning. All expressed frustrations with the police and a deep mistrust of local authorities that long predate Brown’s shooting. Mary Chandler, a 36-year-old mother and government employee who had never attended a demonstration about anything before last week, has been out protesting every day since the shooting. She told me, “It always feels like it’s us against them when it comes from police,” and said police “feel like they are the law so they don’t get in trouble when they break the law.”
The heavy-handed police response to the protests over the past week has done nothing to change that perception. On Sunday, Chandler went to the main protest site on West Florissant Avenue with her 15-year-old daughter, where she said protesters were gathered and milling about. She said that, around sunset, police arrived and ordered the crowd to disperse. As she and her daughter were trying to leave, her daughter was teargassed. Since then, they’ve been going to the quieter, smaller protest site on a tire shop parking lot across the street from the Ferguson police department, about 2 miles away. Late Wednesday night, police drove up to that site in armored trucks and full military-style gear, she said, and ordered them to leave: “They had about 40 or 50 men in it looked like military gear with M-16 [assault rifles], pointing them directly in our faces, and they put the gun in my daughter’s face, and [told us we were] trespassing,” she said. (She said that they had permission to be there from the tire shop’s owner.) Chandler saw one woman, a pastor, get shot in the stomach with a rubber bullet.
Chandler’s account of her experiences throughout the last week of protests—echoed by many others I’ve heard in the last 24 hours—indicates that the police have used unnecessary or excessive force and tactics of intimidation to deter people from exercising their rights to protest peacefully and express their views in public. New concerns are raised by bringing in the National Guard, a branch of the military that lacks full training and experience in law enforcement.
Photo: Demonstrators gesture with their hands up after protests in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown turned violent near Ferguson, Missouri on August 17, 2014. © 2014 Human Rights Watch

humanrightswatch:

On the Ground in Ferguson, Missouri

The unrest that has roiled the city of Ferguson, Missouri, since police fatally shot an unarmed 18-year-old African American, Michael Brown, over a week ago, continues unabated. Sunday night was reportedly the most violent yet, with police firing teargas and rubber bullets and using sound cannons against protesters; Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is calling in the National Guard.

Last night’s police actions took me and many of the protesters I spoke to by surprise, not only because they happened well before the curfew, but because while the crowd I saw was angry, it also seemed peaceful. Yet as I was leaving the barricaded protest area, I saw half a dozen police cars pull up and a group of officers donning gas masks and preparing to enter the protest zone. Police say that they came under assault from gunfire and Molotov cocktails. I can’t say with certainty that they didn’t. But that’s not what protesters on the scene told me; four who had been at the front of the protest said that they didn’t see any attacks on the police, but that the police began teargassing them when the protesters simply tried to go past a line police had said they shouldn’t cross. They saw some protesters smash the windows of a McDonald’s as they were retreating, and throw teargas canisters back at the police—but that’s a far cry from the violence the police have described.

I’ve spoken to many demonstrators since arriving in Ferguson on Sunday morning. All expressed frustrations with the police and a deep mistrust of local authorities that long predate Brown’s shooting. Mary Chandler, a 36-year-old mother and government employee who had never attended a demonstration about anything before last week, has been out protesting every day since the shooting. She told me, “It always feels like it’s us against them when it comes from police,” and said police “feel like they are the law so they don’t get in trouble when they break the law.”

The heavy-handed police response to the protests over the past week has done nothing to change that perception. On Sunday, Chandler went to the main protest site on West Florissant Avenue with her 15-year-old daughter, where she said protesters were gathered and milling about. She said that, around sunset, police arrived and ordered the crowd to disperse. As she and her daughter were trying to leave, her daughter was teargassed. Since then, they’ve been going to the quieter, smaller protest site on a tire shop parking lot across the street from the Ferguson police department, about 2 miles away. Late Wednesday night, police drove up to that site in armored trucks and full military-style gear, she said, and ordered them to leave: “They had about 40 or 50 men in it looked like military gear with M-16 [assault rifles], pointing them directly in our faces, and they put the gun in my daughter’s face, and [told us we were] trespassing,” she said. (She said that they had permission to be there from the tire shop’s owner.) Chandler saw one woman, a pastor, get shot in the stomach with a rubber bullet.

Chandler’s account of her experiences throughout the last week of protests—echoed by many others I’ve heard in the last 24 hours—indicates that the police have used unnecessary or excessive force and tactics of intimidation to deter people from exercising their rights to protest peacefully and express their views in public. New concerns are raised by bringing in the National Guard, a branch of the military that lacks full training and experience in law enforcement.

Photo: Demonstrators gesture with their hands up after protests in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown turned violent near Ferguson, Missouri on August 17, 2014. © 2014 Human Rights Watch

(via mentalalchemy)

August 18, 2014 at 11:59pm
290,734 notes
Reblogged from mvgl

donteversayrocknroll:

mvgl:

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 2x09 - “Cased Up” (November 11, 1991)

fuck

(via mentalalchemy)

August 16, 2014 at 9:57pm
142,575 notes
Reblogged from megaparsecs

megaparsecs:

i just wanted to put this out there since im sure it’ll get written about differently tomorrow. 

(via mermaidsview)

9:18pm
246,906 notes
Reblogged from stair-diving-with-hayes

stair-diving-with-hayes:

Ladies and Gentleman, the man that will be in history books. He was throwing the burning tear gas. Not to the cops but away from the children protesting. In his American Shirt and bag of chips. Check his twitter.

(via moonyandthediamonds)